Language Arts/Drama - Mr. Egan

All About Me Speeches due on Tuesday October 14th, 2014


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Here are some things we are working on currently in language arts.  See the links attached if you need a refresher on any of our lessons that were taught in class.
Reading and Writing














Media Literacy/Oral Visual Communciation
Poetry 
Writing Limericks
The limerick is really the only form of poetry that is original to the English Language.  It first appeared in Songs for the Nursery by Elizabeth Goose.
A limerick has five lines and in its most common form has a special rhyme scheme of aabba.  Its rhythm is as follows:
There was an old man with a beard,
who said, "It is just as I feared!-
    Two owls and a hen
    Four larks and a wren,
Have all built their nests in my beard!" (Edward Lear)

Concrete Poems
Concrete poems or shape poems are written to represent the objects which they describe.

Diamante

A diamante – pronounced dee-uh-MAHN-tay – is an unrhymed seven-line poem. The beginning and ending lines are the shortest, while the lines in the middle are longer, giving diamante poems a diamond shape. “Diamante” is the Italian word for diamond, so this poetic form is named for this diamond shape.

Believe it or not, the diamante was invented just 40 years ago. It was created by an American poet named Iris McClellan Tiedt in 1969, and has become very popular in schools.

Also known as a “diamond poem” because of it’s shape, there are two different types of diamantes; synonym diamantes and antonym diamantes.

The Rules of a Diamante

There are just a few rules to writing a diamante:

  1. Diamantes are seven lines long.
  2. The first and last lines have just one word.
    The second and sixth lines have two words.
    The third and fifth lines have three words.
    And the fourth line has four words.
  3. Lines 1, 4, and 7 have nouns.
    Lines 2 and 6 have adjectives.
    Lines 3 and 5 have verbs.

Here’s an easy way to visualize all three rules:

Noun
Adjective, Adjective
Verb, Verb, Verb
Noun, Noun, Noun, Noun
Verb, Verb, Verb
Adjective, Adjective
Noun

Subpages (1): Reading
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